Healing the Columbia River

News Advisory:   For an evening event in Seattle on September 28, 2017

Healing the Columbia River

An evening to discuss modernizing an international river Treaty

to sustain a river and its people in the 21st Century

To contact Speakers:

Event Contact:

Quotes:

“Tribes in the United States and First Nations in Canada suffered profound damage and loss from Columbia and Snake River dams.  Modernizing the Columbia River Treaty is a critical opportunity for Canada and the United States to join together in acknowledging damage done, right historic wrongs, and commit to stewardship of this great river in the face of climate change.”     John Sirois, Upper Columbia United Tribes, Committee Coordinator

“The Columbia River Treaty is a template for taking without giving anything in return. Many people are unaware of the great harm caused to ecosystems and human culture in British Columbia. We are at a turning moment, one asking us to form a reciprocal relationship to heal the river.”  – Eileen Delehanty Pearkes, author, A River Captured: The Columbia River Treaty and Catastrophic Change

“Our faith teaches us that the Columbia River is not a machine to be used up and thrown away.  Instead it is a sacramental commons, a gift from God, valuable in itself as a living entity.  We can take fish from the River for the benefit of the people, especially Native communities, as long as we do not destroy that which sustains its life.  The well-being of the salmon, especially, is central to the health of the River and of our common home.”  – The Rev. John Rosenberg, ordained pastor, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

“The Upper Columbia River has – and continues to be – the most impacted and least mitigated by dam-building in the Columbia River Basin. As Columbia River Treaty assessments continue, it is essential that sustainable natural-capital value be given serious consideration in actions that impact the river. We must take this opportunity to modernize the Columbia River Treaty for the benefit of all.”  D.R. Michel Upper Columbia United Tribes, Executive Director


What:  These four people will share their unique perspectives and stories about how the 50-year-old Columbia River Treaty has impacted river communities and offer their insights into what an updated, modernized Columbia River Treaty must do to right historic wrongs — sustaining and restoring the Columbia River and the people who rely on the river in this time of climate change.

Fifty years ago, the United States and Canada ratified the Columbia River Treaty to jointly manage hydropower production and flood management.  Our region’s dam-building era, of which the Treaty is a cornerstone, has delivered important benefits to the Northwest – including Seattle.  But the Treaty has also caused catastrophic harm to the river’s health, and communities on both sides of the international border.

Where:  Seattle Mountaineers Building
7700 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA

When:  5:30 – reception with light appetizers and drinks; 6:30 – 8:30 three speakers and panel discussion/audience questions; event concludes at 9:00

Suggested donation $5 (donations to cover our costs are gratefully accepted)

RSVP:  healingthecolumbia.eventbrite.com

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