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Prof. Bill Rodgers and Rep. Derek Stanford to be honored

News Release – Event on June 8

National leader in environmental law, UW’s Bill Rodgers, and Rep. Derek Stanford to be honored for water protection

 

UW Law Professor honored for lifetime’s work as legal scholar, willingness to challenge polluters, protect environment and Indians’ fishing rights

 

Rep. Stanford honored for leadership in Legislature to protect public’s waters in Washington State

 

Contact –

  • Trish Rolfe, Center for Environmental Law & Policy, trolfe@celp.org, 206.829-8299
Rep. Derek Stanford who has provided leadership to protect the public's waters in Washington State.

Rep. Derek Stanford – whose leadership has been essential to protecting the public’s waters in Washington State.

Prof. Bill Rodgers - a giant in environmental law scholarship and attorney for the environment and Indian rights.

Prof. Bill Rodgers – a giant in environmental law scholarship and attorney for the environment and Indian rights.

Seattle – On June 8th in Seattle, a national legal scholar and a state legislative leader, will be honored: UW law professor William “Bill” Rodgers and Rep. Derek Stanford.

“We need to pause and take the time to thank and honor our heroes,” said Trish Rolfe, director of the Center for Environmental Law & Policy. “In this time of climate change, increasing pressure on our rivers and drinking-water aquifers, and rush to exploit the public’s waters, Professor Rodgers and Rep. Stanford deserve thanks and recognition for their public service.”

Professor Rodgers will receive the Ralph Johnson Water Hero Award. Rep. Stanford will receive the Washington Water Policy Award. The awards are presented by the State of Washington’s water watchdog, the Center for Environmental Law & Policy.

The Water Hero Award is given in honor of CELP’s founder, Professor Ralph W. Johnson, a law professor at University of Washington Law School who established the legal discipline of Indian Law and advanced legal understandings of protections for public waters. Past recipients of the award include Billy Frank Jr., (a close friend of Prof. Johnson) on behalf of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission; Swinomish Indian Tribal Community; and Upper Columbia United Tribes (recognizing all Tribes and First Nations working to modernize the Columbia River Treaty).

The Washington Water Policy Award, given for the first time, goes to an elected official or policy maker that shows outstanding contributions to sustainable water policy in Washington. The first to receive this award is Rep. Stanford for his work during the last two years in the House Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee and as vice chair for the Joint Committee, Water Supply During Drought, to help direct state water policy to a more sustainable path.

Honoring Event details

  • Event: Celebrate Water! hosted by the Center for Environmental Law & Policy – Washington’s water watchdog
  • When: June 8 (Wednesday) 5:30 – 7:30.

Note: if you are interested in the Columbia River BiOp decision, a pre-reception “CLE” will be held at 4:00 same venue on that recent decision.   Presenter: Steve Mashuda, Earthjustice

  • Where: Ivar’s Salmon House 401 NE Northlake Way, Seattle
  • Tickets: can be purchased on-line or at the door. Reception – $50; CLE – $30; both – $70

More about Professor Bill Rodgers

  • Eye-witness and participant in writing nation’s environmental laws that ushered in the “environmental revolution” starting the late 1960s, 1970s;
  • lawyer and witness in the “smelter cases,” including ASARCO’s smelter in Tacoma and the arsenic pollution of Tacoma and Puget Sound;
  • lawyer for Indian activists, including after the takeover of the BIA office in Washington,D.C.;
  • worked with attorneys, among them UW law professor Ralph W. Johnson, to protect Indian fishing rights (the Boldt decision), representing the Puyallup Tribe’s treaty rights to salmon; and
  • author of major treatises on environmental law, an academic who has also worked to hold judges, including the U.S. Supreme Court, accountable for their decisions.

Prof. Rodgers is available for interviews.  On a personal note, Bill Rodgers’ daughter, Andrea Rodgers, is a leading environmental attorney representing children challenging the State of Washington to address climate change. (more)

Links –

 

 


November/December Washington Water Watch Issue Is Out

Check out our newest issue of Washington Water Watch!

In this issue, you’ll find articles about Ecology’s Rural Water Supply Workgroup, the success of CELP’s December 3rd CLE event, and our most recent job opening. You will also be introduced to our new Board Chair and Vice Chair, Daryl Williams and John Roskelley, enjoy the poetry of Tina Wynecoop, and more.


May Edition of Washington Water Watch is Here!

Check out our May edition of Washington Water Watch – we discuss the EPA’s new Clean Water Rule, a report released in January 2015 by Earth Economics about Outdoor Recreation in WA, and give updates on litigation and CELP in the News.

Click here to view the newsletter.

Thanks to everyone who came the Celebrate Water on May 21!  - Photo by Jon Anscher Photography

Thanks to everyone who attended, sponsored and volunteered for Celebrate Water on May 21! – Photo by Jon Anscher Photography


Celebrate Water was a Huge Success!

Photo by Jon Anscher Photography

Photo by Jon Anscher Photography

Thanks to our sponsors and all who attended, Celebrate Water was a huge success! Thanks to our CLE presenters, Jean Melious and Patrick Williams, for educating us on current Supreme Court cases concerning Water Rights, Land Use, and Instream Flows. We also heard presentations from Rachael Paschal Osborn about the Columbia River Treaty, and from Adam Wicks-Arshack about his organization, Voyages of Rediscovery, and their work facilitating educational expeditions on the Columbia River. They have published a video, Treaty Talks, about their expedition up the Columbia River from the sea to the source in Canada.

D.R. Michel and Matt Wynne , representing UCUT

D.R. Michel and Matt Wynne , representing UCUT

We had the pleasure of honoring the Upper Columbia United Tribes with the Ralph W. Johnson Water Hero Award in recognition of their efforts towards restoring salmon and the Columbia River. By honoring UCUT, this award also recognizes and honors all 15 Tribes and 17 First Nations of the Columbia Basin for their leadership towards these goals in the United States and Canada respectively.

 

 

 

IMG_2330Thank you to our many sponsors for their support, including: Bob Anderson & Marilyn Heiman, Columbia Institute for Water Policy, UW School of Law – Native American Law Center, Carnegie Group of Thurston County, South Sound Group Sierra Club, Voyages of Rediscovery, Family of Ralph Johnson, Adidas Outdoor, Northwest Swan Conservation Cooperative, Ted Knight, Attorney at Law, Law Offices of Shannon Work, Howard Funke, Kootenai Tribe of Idaho, Fran & Bunny Wood, and the League of Women Voters of Washington

Here are more photos from the event – all photos are by Jon Anscher Photography.

Adam Wicks-Arshack from Voyages of Rediscovery, talking about their video, Treaty Talks

Adam Wicks-Arshack from Voyages of Rediscovery, talking about their video, Treaty Talks

IMG_2546

CELP Board member, Anne Johnson (right)

CELP Honorary Board member, Fran Wood (center) and Estella Leopold (right)

CELP Honorary Board members, Fran Wood (center) and Estella Leopold (right)

IMG_9869

CLE participants asking questions of presenter

Jean Melious presenting for CLE

Jean Melious presenting for CLE

CELP Board Chair John Osborn

CELP Board Chair John Osborn


Upper Columbia United Tribes to be honored for at Celebrate Water for their work to restore salmon to Upper Columbia River

UCUT logo15 Tribes and 17 First Nations press to modernize Columbia River Treaty;  await decision from the U.S. State Department

On May 21 Center for Environmental Law & Policy (CELP) will honor Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) with the Ralph W. Johnson Water Hero Award.  Recognizing UCUT comes at an especially pivotal time in the history of our region:  the U.S. State Department is poised to decide whether to negotiate with Canada over the future of the Columbia River.  The honoring event will be held at Ivar’s Salmon House in Seattle as part of Celebrate Water! an annual event focusing on the future of water in Washington State, hosted by CELP.

The Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) is being honored with the Ralph W. Johnson Water Hero Award for their work in restoring the Upper Columbia River region, including their central role in restoring salmon above Grand Coulee Dam.  By honoring UCUT, this award also recognizes and honors all 15 tribes and 17 First Nations of the Columbia Basin for their leadership in restoring salmon and the Columbia River.  (view map of the Columbia Basin’s 15 tribes, 17 First Nations, and fish barriers)

In December 2013 federal agencies recommended to the State Department that the United States include restoring the ecosystem as a primary purpose of an updated Columbia River Treaty, along with hydropower and flood control, a feature that will make the Treaty a model of international water management. All four Northwest states, 15 Columbia Basin tribes, fishermen and environmentalists support that recommendation.

In the Upper Columbia, dams have devastated fisheries and profoundly damaged tribes and indeed the entire region.  The Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) provides a common voice for the Upper Columbia River region through the collaboration of five major area tribes:  the Coeur d’Alene Tribe, the Kalispel Tribe of Indians, the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho, the Spokane Tribe of Indians, and the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation. UCUT was formed to ensure a healthy future for the traditional territorial lands of Tribal ancestors and takes a proactive and collaborative approach to promoting Indian culture, fish, water, wildlife and habitat.

Celebrate Water! will be held at Ivar’s Salmon House in Seattle, WA on May 21, 2015 from 4:00-7:30pm. A one-credit Continuing Legal Education (CLE) workshop Water Rights, Land Use, Instream Flows:  Current Supreme Court Cases will be held from 4:00-5:00pm. The Celebrate Water reception will take place from 5:30-7:30pm and will include the honoring of UCUT. Tickets are $50 (reception), $30 (CLE) and $70 (CLE and reception).  More information is available at Celebrate Water!

About the Award

Ralph W. Johnson Award is given in honor of CELP’s founder, Professor Ralph W. Johnson.  Professor Johnson co-founded CELP (along with Rachael Paschal Osborn), founded Indian Law, advocated for indigenous people and justice in the salmon wars, and whose jurisprudence was foundational to the Boldt decision.   Past recipients of the award include the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community and Billy Frank Jr., on behalf of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission.

Links –  

Contacts –


Check out our April edition of Washington Water Watch

Click here to read our newest installment of the Washington Water Watch newsletter.

This month, you’ll find articles introducing our new Staff Attorney, Dan Von Seggern, discussing the drought declaration in the state, the status of the Enloe Dam Hydro Project, a summary of the recently released”Freshwater Withdrawals in WA, 2010″ report, and more.

04172015 drought areas - dept of ecology


CELP Hiring Staff Attorney

Center for Environmental Law and Policy (CELP), is seeking candidates for a full-time Staff Attorney. This position will focus on agency advocacy, public interest litigation, policy and legislative work, public outreach, and administrative support. Please see full job description here.

To apply please e-mail cover letter, resume, writing sample (not more than 10 pages), transcript, and references to Trish Rolfe at jobs@celp.org by February 15, 2015.


CLE: Fish, Water, and Health: Water Quality Standards in Washington

Continuing Legal Education (1.0 Credits)

Professor Catherine O’Neill Seattle University School of Law

June 25, 2014 from 4:00-5:00pm at Ivar’s Salmon House

Click here for registration information.

This event takes place in conjunction with CELP’s Annual Event, Celebrate Water. You can attend just the CLE or BOTH! 

Fish, Water, and Health: Water Quality Standards in Washington

Eating fish is the primary way that humans are exposed to PCBs, mercury, and many other toxic pollutants. We know these chemicals cause cancer, permanent neurological damage, and other harms. Yet fish, if they aren’t contaminated, are an excellent source of protein, omega fatty acids, and other nutrients. Doctors would like to see people eat more, not less, of this healthful food. So the question becomes: how much fish can we safely consume? Everyone knows that Washington’s current fish consumption standard is unreasonably low, but the state has been reluctant to adopt a more protective standard, like that of Oregon, because a more protective standard will require more stringent pollution and clean-up standards for Washington’s waterways—standards that industry asserts are unachievable.

Professor Catherine O’Neill of Seattle University School of Law will provide new insights into the legal and scientific complexities underpinning this hot button policy issue. Professor O’Neill has written extensively on the legal issues underpinning this important policy decision that implicates civil rights, environmental justice, human health and natural resource protection, including: Fishable Waters (American Indian Law Journal, 2013); No Mud Pies: Risk Avoidance as Risk Regulation (Vermont Law Review, 2007); Mercury, Risk, and Justice (Environmental Law Reporter, 2004); and Variable Justice: Environmental Standards, Contaminated Fish, and “Acceptable” Risk to Native Peoples (Stanford Environmental Law Journal, 2000).

Read Professor O’Neill’s recent OpEd with Frank James on fish consumption in The Seattle Times here.

 

Biography of Catherine O’Neill

Professor O’Neill was a Ford Foundation Graduate Fellow at Harvard Law School. She came to the Northwest in 1992 as an environmental planner and air toxics coordinator for the Washington State Department of Ecology. From 1994 to1997, she was a Lecturer at the University of Washington School of Law. From 1997 to 2001, Professor O’Neill was Assistant, then Associate Professor at the University of Arizona College of Law. She is a Professor at Seattle University School of Law and is a Faculty Fellow with the Law School’s Center for Indian Law & Policy.

Professor O’Neill’s research focuses on issues of justice in environmental law and policy; in particular, her work considers the effects of contamination and depletion of fish and other resources relied upon by tribes and their members, communities of color and low-income communities. She has worked with the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council on its Fish Consumption Report; with various tribes in the Pacific Northwest and the Great Lakes on issues of contaminated fish and waters; and with environmental justice groups in the Southwest on air and water pollution issues. Professor O’Neill has testified before Congress on regulations governing mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. She has also served as a pro bono consultant to the attorneys for the National Congress of American Indians and other tribes in litigation challenging these mercury regulations. Professor O’Neill is a Member Scholar with the Center for Progressive Reform.


CLE Alert: Climate Change: The Rules are Changing

On April 25, 2014, you are invited to join CELP for a Continuing Legal Education workshop entitled, Climate Change: The Rules are Changing.

We will address current changes and challenges in policies, standards and regulations at local, state, and national levels (and internationally as they impact Washington).  Areas of focus will include: shoreline development, public trust litigation; and legal standing status.  The event is co-sponsored with Futurewise and the Seattle University Law School.

We invite you to view the most up-to-date program and register online through the Seattle University portal here.