Monthly Archives: June 2018


In Memory of Nancy Shuttleworth Rust: Former CELP Board President & Ralph W. Johnson Water Hero Awardee

Nancy was born in Iowa City, Iowa on September 15, 1928, the second of the three daughters of Beatrice Gates Shuttleworth and Frank Kayley Shuttleworth. She married the love of her life, Dr. Richard Eno Rust, on June 11, 1949. She received a Master’s degree in Mathematics from the University of Iowa in 1952.

Nancy served as a member of Washington State’s House of Representatives from 1981-1996, having begun a life of political activism by joining the League of Women Voters in the mid-1950s. As a member of the League, Nancy worked on voter registration campaigns, numerous ballot initiatives, tax reform, and the Equal Rights Amendment. From her sixty-some years of involvement in politics and community service, she will be most remembered for her work on environmental issues. She chaired the House Environmental Affairs Committee from 1983-1994. As Chair, Nancy oversaw passage of (or protected from modification) legislation regarding hazardous waste management, workers’ right to know, shorelines management, growth management, and legislation to prevent oil spills on Puget Sound.

Nancy was named the Audubon Legislator of the Year for the legislative sessions of 1983-84 and 1986-87, and she was named the Legislator of the Year by the Washington Recyclers in 1982. After leaving the legislature she continued to work for the environment in many ways, including serving as board president for the Center for Environmental Law and Policy (CELP). In 2006, she was the recipient of CELP’s Ralph Johnson award, which is given in honor of “exemplary service on behalf of Washington’s waters and people.”

Along with her involvement in public affairs, Nancy led a vibrant and varied personal life. The mother of six children, she was active in the PTA and was on the board of Greater Seattle Girl Scouts. she was active in the PTA, served on the board of Greater Seattle Girl Scouts, led Girl Scout troops, and went on countless Girl Scout outings. Having grown up on the East Coast, she fell in love with the Pacific Northwest on her first visit to the area in 1951. She enjoyed getting out into nature in all kinds of ways, whether by day-hiking, back-packing, skiing, biking or as a member of the Washington Native Plant Society.

Nancy and her husband Dick were active in the Bicycle Adventure Club–participating in 40-some multi-day rides–and led a popular 14-day ride that began in Seattle and wound its way through the San Juan Islands to Victoria BC. She and Dick were also avid international travelers. Many of their trips to Europe were on bicycle, but they also enjoyed numerous trips in Europe and beyond as participants in Elder Hostel and Roads Scholars programs.

Back home in Seattle, Nancy loved the symphony, opera, fine arts, and theatre. In synchrony with any other activity, Nancy enjoyed knitting. After knitting multiple sweaters for members of the family, she knit clothing items for a nonprofit humanitarian aid organization, afghans for Afghans.

Memories of Nancy will be cherished by her beloved husband; her two sisters, Margaret Vernallis and Carol Hake and brother-in-law Dexter; her six children, Martha (and spouse Leslie Myrick), David (Janice Reebs), Steven (Cate Brigden), Michael (Julia Sabo), Amy, and Elizabeth; three grandchildren, Arcadia Smails and grandson-in-law Rodney Minott, Alexa Rust, and Benjamin Rust; and one great grandson, Joseph Minott.

A celebration of Nancy’s life will be held on August 12 from 3:00-5:00 PM at Horizon House  at 900 University St. in Seattle (off-street parking available at the corner of University St. and 9th Avenue).


Celebrate Water 2018 Successes: Thank You!

Thanks to our sponsors and all our supporters who attended Celebrate Water this year! We had a wonderful time at Ivar’s once again this year commemorating yet another successful year of CELP’s work to preserve, protect and restore Washington’s water resources. And special thank you to our CLE presenter, Robert T. Anderson, for educating us on the Culvert Case!

We were thrilled to honor Sara Foster, Laura Leigh Brakke, David Stalheim, Eric Hirst and Wendy Harris with the Ralph W. Johnson Water Hero Award for their activism in the Hirst and Foster Supreme Court Cases. Their diligence ultimately resulted in improved protections and management of Washington’s rivers and streams by the Department of Ecology. Our honorees began as concerned citizens, and the wins they secured in the Washington Supreme Court would not have been possible with the collective dedication and involvement of these five individuals. Thank you, again, to our five honorees for their contributions towards ensuring future generations have access to clean and flowing water in Washington!

Ralph W. Johnson awardees & CELP Board members. R to L: Eric Hirst, Wendy Harris, Jean Melious, Laura Leigh Brakke, David Stalheim, Sara Foster and Patrick Williams.

Thank you to our many sponsors for their support, including Adidas Outdoor, Kampmeier & Knutsen PLLC, Smith & Lowney PLLC, Wright Yachts, Columbia Institute for Water PolicySouth Sound Group Sierra Club, Deschutes Estuary Restoration TeamLaw Offices of M. Patrick Williams and Olympia Urban Waters League.


Patagonia to host Tribal film

Film:  United by Water

July 12,  7 p.m.  Patagonia Seattle  2100 1st Ave, Seattle 

RSVP BEFORE and receive a free raffle ticket at the door.


  • Orcas depend on Columbia River salmon for survival. 
  • Seattle is powered partly by Columbia River dams. 
  • The Trump and Trudeau Administrations are excluding tribes, First Nations from treaty negotiations about the future of the Columbia River. 
  • This film is timely, and we encourage you to attend and meet with tribal leaders.  Indigenous people need our help.

“The River is sacred.  People will put aside their differences when it comes to the River and bringing back the salmon.”

                 – the late Virgil Seymour (1958 – 2016) Arrow Lakes (Sinixt) Facilitator for The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) presents this documentary about canoe journeys on the Upper Columbia River, using dugout canoes from 800-hundred-year-old cedar logs, and the emotional historic landing at Kettle Falls, among the world’s richest salmon-fishing sites flooded when Grand Coulee Dam was constructed. 

DR Michel and John Sirois of UCUT will talk about work of tribes (US) and First Nations (Canada), including the need for Columbia River tribes to be at the negotiation table as the U.S. Dept of State re-negotiates with Canada the Columbia River Treaty.  Negotiations began May 29 in Washington DC.  We’ll have postcards to write/send to our Congressional representatives, asking them to hold accountable the State Department to give tribes a place at the table, and give a voice to the River and salmon. We hope to see you there.

Watch the trailer.


More about “United by Water”

76 years after the Ceremony of Tears, and the last salmon at Kettle Falls – United by Water reaches back, reconnecting with time immemorial to help us unite together for the River and for salmon.

On June 14, 1940, thousands of Native Americans from throughout the Northwest gathered at Kettle Falls – thunderous waterfalls and one of the world’s richest salmon fishing sites – for a three-day “Ceremony of Tears” to mourn the loss of their ancestral fishing grounds, soon to be flooded by Grand Coulee Dam on the Columbia River.  “United by Water” documents the journey of five tribal communities to Kettle Falls, the fishing site of their ancestors, in the growing struggle to return salmon to the Upper Columbia and reclaim the lives and future for indigenous people.

The film, produced by the Upper Columbia United Tribes, headquartered in Spokane, shows breathtaking archival footage of the last salmon ceremony on the Columbia prior to the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam. It then documents the inspiring 2016 journey on the river – the building of the dugout canoes, the physical and spiritual journey on the Columbia River, and finally the emotional historic landing at Kettle Falls.

United by Water will show at Patagonia Seattle on July 12, 7 p.m.

Representatives from the Upper Columbia United Tribes who appear in the film, D.R. Michel and John Sirois, will speak after the screening about their work, the renegotiation of the Columbia River Treaty, the impact of the dams on salmon, and the annual canoe journeys on the River, utilizing dug out canoes.

UCUT.jpg

The award-winning documentary highlights the need to recognize the importance of reconnecting to the Columbia River and restoring salmon runs. Not only does the film bring attention to the historic wrongs that blocked salmon from the Upper Columbia River, but it shares the current efforts by UCUT and other tribes (US) and First Nations (Canada) to bring forward tribal traditions to help better understand what is lacking in our contemporary society. We need to forge a deeper connection to the waters that bring life to our communities.

The film comes at a critical time as the US government has begun renegotiating the Columbia River Treaty and indigenous nations are advocating to the U.S. State Department their rightful place at the negotiation table to give voice to the Columbia River, salmon, and people of the river.

Partners of this film screening include the Upper Columbia United Tribes, Center for Environmental Law and Policy, Sierra Club’s Columbia River Future Project, Save Our Wild Salmon, Columbia Institute for Water Policy, and the Backbone Campaign.  Admission is by donation to the Backbone Campaign, with no one turned away for lack of funds.   Proceeds will help go to support the Tribes’ River Warriors project.

Film co-sponsored by: