State Dept “Town Hall” meeting on Columbia River Treaty, future

The United States and Canada are negotiating the Columbia River Treaty. We have a once in a lifetime opportunity to help protect and restore the Columbia River. On September 6, the U.S. State Department will give you an opportunity to provide input. Please take time to attend this Town Hall meeting – for the River and life that depends on the River.

When: Sept 6, 5:30 – 7 p.m.

Where: Portland, Bonneville Power Administration’s Rates Hearing Room, 1201 Llyod Blvd, Suite 200 (across the street from the current BPA Building)

Treaty Town Hall:  messages for the State Department

Below are suggested messages that may help you in developing your own personal message to deliver to the State Department’s negotiating team for the Columbia River Treaty:

RIGHTING HISTORIC WRONGS.  On June 14, 1940, 10,000 indigenous people from throughout the Northwest gathered at Kettle Falls for the “Ceremony of Tears” to mourn the loss of ancestral fishing grounds soon to be flooded by Grand Coulee dam. Adding Ecosystem-based Function to the Treaty as a primary purpose would include restoring salmon above Grand Coulee dam. (Credit: UW Special Collections)

(1) “Ecosystem-based Function” must be included as a new primary purpose of a new Columbia River Treaty – co-equal with power production and flood management. At its heart, ecosystem-based function is a way to achieve a healthier river and healthier fish and wildlife populations. It means operational changes that provide additional water during low and moderate flow years in the spring and summer to increase survival of juvenile salmon migrating downstream to the Pacific Ocean. It also includes fish passage and reintroduction of salmon above Grand Coulee Dam and into Canada.  The world watched as the mother orca Talequah carried her dead baby for 17 days 1,000 miles, calling attention to the starving orcas of Puget Sound — and once again underscoring the importance of Columbia River salmon. 

(2) The River needs a voice during Treaty negotiations.  The U.S. should add a representative for “ecosystem function” to the Treaty negotiating team. 

(3)  The U.S. and Canada have excluded tribes and First Nations from the negotiating teams — and this needs to be corrected.  Under the laws of both countries it is clear this this Treaty impacts the shared resources held by tribes in the U.S., as well as those resources in Canada to which rights and title have not been extinguished.

(4) The River needs a voice during Treaty implementation.  U.S. should add a new, third representative to the “U.S. Entity” that can represent the river’s ecosystem needs during treaty implementation.

The U.S. Entity today includes just two federal dam agencies – BPA and ACOE – neither has a record as a responsible steward of natural resources like wild salmon and steelhead, lamprey and other species. The U.S. Entity must include a new voice for the river and its health.

(5) Citizen input is needed.  The U.S. should create an advisory committee to the U.S. Entity that allows stakeholders to understand and share information about the operation of the Treaty dams, and their impacts on communities and natural resources.

(6) Make informed decisions using a shared, transparent information base.  Create a common analytic base between both nations and all those affected by re-establishing the collaborative modeling workgroup.

(7) We need best options for flood risk management.  Residents in the greater Portland and Vancouver metropolitan area want to understand the costs, benefits and tradeoffs from today’s flood management strategies – as well as possible alternatives. In order to prepare, the U.S. Army Corps should conduct a basin-wide review of flood risk management.

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