Archives


Remembering Jess Roskelley

 

Our deepest condolences go out to board member John Roskelley and his family after the tragic passing of their son Jess at just 36 years old. With his unexpected passing, Jess leaves behind a wonderful wife Alli, two loving parents -John and Joyce, a sister Jordan, and 2 dogs. They are all incredible individuals who deserve the very best care, love, and support in order to get through this devastating time.

To anyone who knew him, Jess was an incredible husband, son, and alpinist.  For more information on the Roskelley family and Jess’ legacy, click here: https://bit.ly/2XIG9rA

CELP has said up a memorial fund page is to support the Roskelley family after the devastating passing of their son. Jess’ passing is tragic not only for his loss of life but also for the effects on his family. Please know that any amount — no matter how small — will benefit the Roskelley’s. Click HERE to help out the Roskelley family.

 


Washington Water Watch: April 2019 Edition

Dear friends of CELP,  It’s been a while  since our last Washington Water Watch and CELP has been busy working to protect and restore Washington’s waters. This year is shaping up to be a critical year for water in Washington, as the Department of Ecology just declared a drought in  three  watersheds: The Upper Yakima, Okanogan, and Methow. This could be bad news for fish and our population of Resident Orca’s.

 

March was unprecedentedly dry, and it is likely to only get worse from here. The coming months are forecast to be warmer and drier than normal, putting more and more areas around the state at risk. The warmer the summers get with Climate Change; the more frequently droughts are likely to occur. The only way we can proactively combat this is to start planning now and encourage the state to prioritize sound sustainable water policy. All this makes CELP’s work more critical than ever, but our work would not be possible without supporters like you. We rely on our generous donations from our members and supporters to hold our lawmakers and agencies accountable for protecting Washington’s rivers and streams. Renew your membership today on our secure website.

 

In this issue you will find information about this year’s Celebrate Waters and GiveBIG campaign, CELP’s newest staff members, an upcoming Ethics Conference, a recap of CELP’s first ever Lobby Day as well as Winter Waters, a legislative wrap up and more.

 

Sincerely,
 Trish
Trish Rolfe
Executive Director
trolfe@celp.org

 

P.S. April 22nd is Earth Day and CELP will be working to protect Washington’s rivers and streams! You can help support that work by Making a donation today!

 

Click HERE to read the full report. 


GiveBIG 2019

Give Big takes place on May 8, 2019

 

Big news! CELP is participating in Give Big once again. The one-day online giving campaign will support your local non-profits in their efforts to make Washington an even better place to live. During the 24 hour giving window on Wednesday May 8th, we encourage you to not only help protect Washington’s waters by giving to CELP, but to explore the hundreds of other non-profit organizations that are working towards shaping the future of our state.

 

This year is shaping up to be a critical year for water in Washington, as the Department of Ecology just declared a drought in three watersheds: The Upper Yakima, Okanogan, and Methow. This could be bad news for fish and our population of Resident Orca’s.

 

March was unprecedentedly dry, and it is likely to only get worse from here. The coming months are forecast to be warmer and drier than normal, putting more and more areas around the state at risk. The warmer the summers get with Climate Change; the more frequently droughts are likely to occur. The only way we can proactively combat this is to start planning now and encourage the state to prioritize sound sustainable water policy. All this makes CELP’s work more critical than ever, but our work would not be possible without supporters like you. We rely on our generous donations from our members and supporters to hold our lawmakers and agencies accountable for protecting Washington’s rivers and streams.

 

To participate in this years GiveBIG click here.

 

Simple.  Effective. Giving.


CELP Summer Internship

We are now accepting applications for a Summer 2019 Legal Intern at our Seattle office.

We seek a legal intern with demonstrated interest in environmental issues to work on projects aimed at establishing protected instream flows.  Qualified candidates will have completed their 2L year and taken an environmental law course.  Coursework or clinical experience in administrative law is preferred. Exact internship dates are flexible, but will run from June – August 2019. Please email a CV, a writing sample, and references to Dan Von Seggern, Staff Attorney  at dvonseggern@celp.org 

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Deadline for applications is March 1st.

 


Join CELP and CCA Lower Columbia to Learn about Protecting Streamflow and Fish Habitat in Southwest Washington

Join the Coastal Conservation Association Washington’s Lower Columbia Chapter for their November meeting and learn about protecting streamflow and fish habitat in southwest Washington.

CELP’s Water Policy Organizer Nick Manning will be presenting and discussing protection efforts for the Cowlitz, Lewis, Grays and Elochoman Rivers. Bring questions and a friend (or two).

Food and drink will be available. All are welcome to attend!

  • When: Thursday, November 8 @ 6:30 pm
  • Where: The Carriage Restaurant — 1334 12th Avenue, Longview WA

Hirst Update: Watershed Restoration and Enhancement Committees

by Trish Rolfe
Last session, the Washington State Legislature passed a streamflow restoration law, ESSB 6091, in response to the Supreme Court’s

Hirst decision. Hirst changed how counties could approve or deny building permits that use permit-exempt wells for a water source.

The law, RCW 90.94 Streamflow Restoration, helps protect water resources while providing water for rural residents reliant on permit exempt wells. The law directs local planning groups in 15 watersheds to develop or update plans that offset potential impacts to instream flows associated with new permit-exempt domestic water use. The law splits up these watersheds into two groups: those with previously adopted watershed plans and those without.

The Nooksack, Nisqually, Lower Chehalis, Upper Chehalis, Okanogan, Little Spokane, and Colville basins all have previously adopted watershed plans. For these seven basins, local watershed planning units are to update their watershed plan in order to compensate for the impacts of new permit exempt well uses.
The law identifies the Nooksack and Nisqually basins as the first two to be completed. They have until February 2019 to adopt a plan; if they fail to do so, Ecology must adopt related rules no later than August 2020. Planning units in the Lower Chehalis, Upper Chehalis, Okanogan, Little Spokane, and Colville basins have until February 2021 to develop their plans. Until watershed plans are updated and rules are adopted in these seven watersheds, new permit-exempt wells require only payment of a $500 fee. The maximum withdrawal is 3,000 gallons per day per connection on an annual average basis.

Deschutes River – Photo from WA Dept of Ecology

Eight other watersheds do not have previously adopted watershed plans. They are Snohomish, Cedar-Sammamish, Duwamish-Green, Puyallup-White, Chambers-Clover, Deschutes, Kennedy-Goldsborough, and Kitsap. For these eight basins:

  • Ecology will establish and chair watershed committees and invite representatives from local governments, tribes, and interest groups.
  • The plans for these watersheds are due June 30, 2021.
  • New permit-exempt wells require payment of a $500 fee.. The maximum withdrawal is 950 gallons per day per connection, on an annual average basis. During drought, this may be curtailed to 350 gallons per day per connection for indoor use only.
  • Building permit applicants in these areas must adequately manage stormwater onsite.

CELP has been appointed to participate on the Snohomish, Cedar-Sammamish and Duwamish-Green watershed planning units, and we have volunteers participating in several others.

The law also provides $300 million until 2033 for projects that will help fish and streamflows. Watershed planning groups will recommend proposals for funding by Ecology to achieve this.

Litigation News: Freeing the Similkameen River and Dungeness River Rule Challenge

by Dan Von Seggern

CELP Continues Fight to Free Similkameen River

The long-running battle to remove this environmentally damaging and economically unjustifiable Enloe Dam continues. A major tributary to the Okanogan River, the Similkameen flows through 122 miles of potential salmon habitat in British Columbia and Washington. A fish-blocking dam was constructed on the River in 1922 and has not generated power since 1958. The Okanogan County Public Utility District (PUD), which owns the dam, is attempting to restart power generation at the dam. The power the dam would produce is not needed and would be much more expensive than the PUD’s current sources of electricity.

On September 13, along with the Sierra Club and Columbiana, CELP filed a Notice of Intent to Sue the Okanogan County PUD as well as the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) over the dam’s effect on ESA-listed Upper Columbia steelhead and Chinook salmon. The Notice is the first step towards filing a lawsuit under the Endangered Species Act. We contend that the dam unlawfully harms ESA-listed fish species, that the process of evaluating the dam’s impact on fish was inadequate, and that FERC unlawfully failed to consult with NMFS regarding the listed fish, as the Endangered Species Act requires.

In a separate action, CELP has asked the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals to review FERC’s giving the PUD additional time to begin construction. The Federal Power Act requires that construction be started within the period of a hydroelectric license, and allows only a single two-year extension. When the PUD failed to begin construction within the required time, FERC “stayed” revocation of the license, effectively giving the PUD additional time. CELP believes that FERC lacked authority to “extend” the license in this manner and that it should have allowed public participation in the license amendment process.

Dungeness River Rule Challenge

This case (Bassett et al. v. Ecology, Case No. 51221-1-II) is a challenge by a group of property rights activists and developers to the Department of Ecology’s Instream Flow Rule for the Dungeness River, WAC 173-518.  CELP supports the Rule, which provides for mitigated use of new permit-exempt wells while protecting instream resources.  After the plaintiffs filed suit against Ecology, CELP joined in the case as an intervener to argue in favor of the Rule. CELP and Ecology prevailed in Thurston County Superior Court, and plaintiffs appealed.   Division II of the Washington Court of Appeals heard oral argument in the case on October 18 and we are now awaiting the Court’s ruling.

Washington Water Watch: July 2018 Edition

In this issue, a recap on Celebrate Water, a tribute to former CELP Board President and Ralph W. Johnson Water Hero Award Nancy Rust, an update on the Culvert case, an introduction to CELP’s summer legal intern, Meredith Bro, and more. Read the July 2018 issue of Washington Water Watch here.

Join CELP at the Southwest Washington Fair!

Since 1909, the Southwest Washington fair in Chehalis has drawn crowds from all over the state to play, compete, eat, and learn. Whether you want to rock out to the all-female AC/DC cover band “Hells Belles,” test your luck on the carnival rides, feast on a variety of fried breads, admire the livestock and harvests from farmers all over Washington, or learn from a variety of informational and fun exhibits, we would love to see you there!

The fair runs from August 14 to 19, and CELP will be operating a booth in the exposition building Thursday, August 16 to Sunday, August 19. We will be talking with folks about protecting their water resources and building support behind establishing instream flows in Southwest Washington (more information on instream flows can be found under “water programs”). There are 11 free tickets available for anyone who would like to volunteer to come down and help with the booth, as well as parking passes and camping spots.

If you would like to help promote sustainable water management while also experiencing one of Washington’s most iconic gatherings, please email Nick Manning at nmanning@celp.org. We hope to see you there!