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Conservation groups ready to go to court over endangered species harmed by north-central Washington dam

Today, river advocacy groups notified federal agencies and a local public utility of their intent to sue over harm inflicted on Similkameen River endangered steelhead and threatened bull trout by Enloe Dam. New video evidence shows fish at the base of the dam unable to access stream areas above the dam that may be critical to their recovery. However, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and the Okanogan Public Utility District (OPUD) have failed to reinitiate consultation to address how this new information affects a permit to construct a power generating facility at the dam. Today’s notice starts a 60-day clock until a lawsuit can be filed.

“This new evidence showing fish, most likely Chinook salmon, jumping at the base of Enloe Dam provides new evidence that FERC’s analysis that re-energizing Enloe Dam would have ‘no effect’ on the critically imperiled species that live in the river was incorrect,” said Andrew Hawley of the Western Environmental Law Center. “The upper Columbia River steelhead that use the Similkameen River for example are known to be better leapers than Chinook, and according to NMFS’s own biologists, it is very likely that steelhead are indeed navigating the falls below the dam. This fact requires a new analysis of the dam’s impacts under the Endangered Species Act.”

“This new information only adds to the body of evidence showing that leaving Enloe Dam in place is a mistake,” said Trish Rolfe, Executive Director of the Center for Environmental Law and Policy. “As we continue to look for ways to rehabilitate our flagging salmon and steelhead populations, it makes little sense to ignore the impact this project will have on the ability of these fish to access the 200 or so miles of viable habitat upstream of the dam.”

OPUD has faced strong local opposition to its plan to re-energize Enloe Dam due to environmental concerns as well as economic issues. Multiple economic analyses show that power generated by the project will cost far more than electricity from other sources, burdening ratepayers that live in one of the most economically disadvantaged counties in Washington. The PUD’s project would also continue to impact the culturally, ecologically and recreationally significant Similkameen Falls (also called Coyote Falls), which lies immediately downstream of the dam.

“The plight of Puget Sound orca starving for want of salmon combined with the fundamental lack of economic viability should lead to removing this century-old cement plug,” said John Osborn, physician and coordinator of Sierra Club’s Columbia River Future Project. “Fish jumping in vain at the base of Enloe Dam is yet another terrible reminder of federal agencies failing to make the correct diagnosis for salmon, steelhead, and other species in trouble.  Fortunately, the Governor’s Task Force on Orca is now looking at removing Enloe Dam – as has occurred for restoring the Elwha River on the Olympic Peninsula and other rivers in Washington state.”

“OPUD’s FERC license allows it to operate Enloe until 2063,” said Jere Gillespie of Columbiana. “To avoid red ink, OPUD will have no choice but to pass the costs along to the ratepayers into the next generation. What makes sense for the Similkameen and for ratepayers is to free the river of this cement plug and not throw good money after bad. It’s more compelling to restore the river. Coyote Falls is an increasingly important regional attraction because of an expanding local and regional trail system, and salmon can be seen swimming above waterfalls to the base of the damA free flowing Similkameen will enhance economic growth for the local community.”

The groups note that they have been and remain willing to work with the PUD to develop a path forward for restoring the river that addresses ecological and cultural issues and the economic concern for ratepayers. The Western Environmental Law Center sent the notice on behalf of the Center for Environmental Law & Policy, Columbiana, and Sierra Club.

Video of Chinook jumping at the base of the dam can be viewed here. Letters from NMFS and USFWS supporting reinitiating consultation are available here and here.

Contacts:

  • Andrew Hawley, Western Environmental Law Center, 206-487-7250, hawley@westernlaw.org
  • Trish Rolfe, Center for Environmental Law & Policy, 206-829-8299, trolfe@celp.org
  • John Osborn, Sierra Club, 509-939-1290, john@waterplanet.ws

Columbia River Treaty Negotiating Team out of step with Northwest Values

Sept 6 in Portland:

Northwest residents encouraged to speak with U.S. State Department at “Town Hall” meeting on future of the Columbia River and Treaty

Contact:

A broad coalition of conservation, sports, and fishing organizations today delivered a letter to the State Department asking for important changes to the 1964 Columbia River Treaty, which the United States and Canada are currently renegotiating. They are also encouraging residents to speak on behalf of the Columbia River’s future at a State Department “Townhall meeting” to be held in Portland on September 6, 5:30-7 p.m., at the Bonneville Power Administration.

“The renegotiation of the treaty offers a unique opportunity to improve conditions in the river by ensuring treaty dams are operated to provide sufficient flows for the express purpose of helping salmon and the river’s ecosystem,” said Greg Haller, Executive Director for Pacific Rivers. “River health, ‘Ecosystem-based function’ needs to be added to the Columbia River Treaty, co-equal with the two existing primary purposes of the treaty: hydropower production and flood risk management. Millions of residents and electrical ratepayers expect balanced management of the region’s hydroelectric facilities to ensure salmon populations recover and thrive. The treaty is an important prong of a basin-wide strategy for salmon recovery and we are asking the State Department for a course correction to improve river conditions in the U.S. and Canada for the benefit of fish, wildlife and people.”

In a letter sent to the lead negotiator, Jill Smail, U.S. Department of State, the requests include:

  • Protect and enhance the immense value of the Columbia Basin ecosystem by recognizing it as an authorized purpose of a modernized treaty, co-equal with flood risk management and hydropower generation.
  • Expand the group that oversees Treaty implementation, called the “U.S. Entity” to include appropriate representation for ecosystem function. Now the U.S. Entity consists only of Bonneville Power Administration (hydropower) and the Army Corps of Engineers (flood risk management).
  • Create advisory committees of affected stakeholders and sovereigns to support the U.S. Entity in treaty implementation.
  • Reform the U.S. negotiating team to ensure balanced representation of the issues involved, including giving a voice to Ecosystem-based Function.
  • Support a review of flood risk management that is essential for better managing the system of dams to protect river health while protecting Portland and Vancouver, Washington.
  • Restore the bi-national Collaborative Modeling Workgroup to establish a shared information based so that both nations together can make informed decisions about the Columbia River.  

The Columbia River Treaty was originally ratified in 1964 to reduce the risk of floods in downstream cities like Portland, Oregon and to develop additional hydropower capacity. The Treaty resulted in building four major dams, three in British Columbia and one in Montana. Notably, consideration of the health of the Columbia River and its fish and wildlife populations were not included in the original Treaty. Not only did the construction of the dams result in the displacement of people, economies and cultures as a result of permanently flooded lands, it had a profound effect on salmon and other fish and wildlife species – and the communities that rely on them – on both sides of the border.

“For 17 days the world watched as the mother orca Talequah carrying her dead calf for a thousand miles, reminding us how precious and fragile is life that depends on Columbia River salmon,” said John Osborn, a physician who coordinates Sierra Club’s Columbia River Future Project. “River temperatures are rising, returning salmon face ever more massive die-offs, glaciers are melting and forests are burning. In this time of climate change we call upon the State Department to represent the values of the people of the Northwest in protecting and restoring the Columbia River. Water is life. ”

At its heart, Ecosystem-based Function is a way to achieve a healthier river and healthier fish and wildlife populations. It means operational changes that provide additional water during low and moderate flow years in the spring and summer to increase survival of juvenile salmon migrating downstream to the Pacific Ocean. It also includes fish passage and reintroduction of salmon above Grand Coulee Dam and into Canada, and to stop using the Upper Columbia River as a sacrifice zone.

More about the U.S. State Department’s Town Hall meeting in Portland:

The Columbia River Treaty Town Hall meeting is open to the public, and will take place in Portland at the Bonneville Power Administration’s Rates Hearing Room 1201 Llyod Blvd, Suite 200 (11th Avenue/Holladay Park Max light rail stop), from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.  This Townhall will follow the August 15–16 round of negotiations on the Treaty regime in British Columbia and take place in advance of the October 17–18 round of negotiations in Portland, Oregon.  For more information on the Town Hall, including call-in details, please see the Federal Register Notice.

Links:

 

 

 


State Dept “Town Hall” meeting on Columbia River Treaty, future

The United States and Canada are negotiating the Columbia River Treaty. We have a once in a lifetime opportunity to help protect and restore the Columbia River. On September 6, the U.S. State Department will give you an opportunity to provide input. Please take time to attend this Town Hall meeting – for the River and life that depends on the River.

When: Sept 6, 5:30 – 7 p.m.

Where: Portland, Bonneville Power Administration’s Rates Hearing Room, 1201 Llyod Blvd, Suite 200 (across the street from the current BPA Building)

Treaty Town Hall:  messages for the State Department

Below are suggested messages that may help you in developing your own personal message to deliver to the State Department’s negotiating team for the Columbia River Treaty:

RIGHTING HISTORIC WRONGS.  On June 14, 1940, 10,000 indigenous people from throughout the Northwest gathered at Kettle Falls for the “Ceremony of Tears” to mourn the loss of ancestral fishing grounds soon to be flooded by Grand Coulee dam. Adding Ecosystem-based Function to the Treaty as a primary purpose would include restoring salmon above Grand Coulee dam. (Credit: UW Special Collections)

(1) “Ecosystem-based Function” must be included as a new primary purpose of a new Columbia River Treaty – co-equal with power production and flood management. At its heart, ecosystem-based function is a way to achieve a healthier river and healthier fish and wildlife populations. It means operational changes that provide additional water during low and moderate flow years in the spring and summer to increase survival of juvenile salmon migrating downstream to the Pacific Ocean. It also includes fish passage and reintroduction of salmon above Grand Coulee Dam and into Canada.  The world watched as the mother orca Talequah carried her dead baby for 17 days 1,000 miles, calling attention to the starving orcas of Puget Sound — and once again underscoring the importance of Columbia River salmon. 

(2) The River needs a voice during Treaty negotiations.  The U.S. should add a representative for “ecosystem function” to the Treaty negotiating team. 

(3)  The U.S. and Canada have excluded tribes and First Nations from the negotiating teams — and this needs to be corrected.  Under the laws of both countries it is clear this this Treaty impacts the shared resources held by tribes in the U.S., as well as those resources in Canada to which rights and title have not been extinguished.

(4) The River needs a voice during Treaty implementation.  U.S. should add a new, third representative to the “U.S. Entity” that can represent the river’s ecosystem needs during treaty implementation.

The U.S. Entity today includes just two federal dam agencies – BPA and ACOE – neither has a record as a responsible steward of natural resources like wild salmon and steelhead, lamprey and other species. The U.S. Entity must include a new voice for the river and its health.

(5) Citizen input is needed.  The U.S. should create an advisory committee to the U.S. Entity that allows stakeholders to understand and share information about the operation of the Treaty dams, and their impacts on communities and natural resources.

(6) Make informed decisions using a shared, transparent information base.  Create a common analytic base between both nations and all those affected by re-establishing the collaborative modeling workgroup.

(7) We need best options for flood risk management.  Residents in the greater Portland and Vancouver metropolitan area want to understand the costs, benefits and tradeoffs from today’s flood management strategies – as well as possible alternatives. In order to prepare, the U.S. Army Corps should conduct a basin-wide review of flood risk management.

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For further Information, contact:


Patagonia to host Tribal film

Film:  United by Water

July 12,  7 p.m.  Patagonia Seattle  2100 1st Ave, Seattle 

RSVP BEFORE and receive a free raffle ticket at the door.


  • Orcas depend on Columbia River salmon for survival. 
  • Seattle is powered partly by Columbia River dams. 
  • The Trump and Trudeau Administrations are excluding tribes, First Nations from treaty negotiations about the future of the Columbia River. 
  • This film is timely, and we encourage you to attend and meet with tribal leaders.  Indigenous people need our help.

“The River is sacred.  People will put aside their differences when it comes to the River and bringing back the salmon.”

                 – the late Virgil Seymour (1958 – 2016) Arrow Lakes (Sinixt) Facilitator for The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

Upper Columbia United Tribes (UCUT) presents this documentary about canoe journeys on the Upper Columbia River, using dugout canoes from 800-hundred-year-old cedar logs, and the emotional historic landing at Kettle Falls, among the world’s richest salmon-fishing sites flooded when Grand Coulee Dam was constructed. 

DR Michel and John Sirois of UCUT will talk about work of tribes (US) and First Nations (Canada), including the need for Columbia River tribes to be at the negotiation table as the U.S. Dept of State re-negotiates with Canada the Columbia River Treaty.  Negotiations began May 29 in Washington DC.  We’ll have postcards to write/send to our Congressional representatives, asking them to hold accountable the State Department to give tribes a place at the table, and give a voice to the River and salmon. We hope to see you there.

Watch the trailer.


More about “United by Water”

76 years after the Ceremony of Tears, and the last salmon at Kettle Falls – United by Water reaches back, reconnecting with time immemorial to help us unite together for the River and for salmon.

On June 14, 1940, thousands of Native Americans from throughout the Northwest gathered at Kettle Falls – thunderous waterfalls and one of the world’s richest salmon fishing sites – for a three-day “Ceremony of Tears” to mourn the loss of their ancestral fishing grounds, soon to be flooded by Grand Coulee Dam on the Columbia River.  “United by Water” documents the journey of five tribal communities to Kettle Falls, the fishing site of their ancestors, in the growing struggle to return salmon to the Upper Columbia and reclaim the lives and future for indigenous people.

The film, produced by the Upper Columbia United Tribes, headquartered in Spokane, shows breathtaking archival footage of the last salmon ceremony on the Columbia prior to the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam. It then documents the inspiring 2016 journey on the river – the building of the dugout canoes, the physical and spiritual journey on the Columbia River, and finally the emotional historic landing at Kettle Falls.

United by Water will show at Patagonia Seattle on July 12, 7 p.m.

Representatives from the Upper Columbia United Tribes who appear in the film, D.R. Michel and John Sirois, will speak after the screening about their work, the renegotiation of the Columbia River Treaty, the impact of the dams on salmon, and the annual canoe journeys on the River, utilizing dug out canoes.

UCUT.jpg

The award-winning documentary highlights the need to recognize the importance of reconnecting to the Columbia River and restoring salmon runs. Not only does the film bring attention to the historic wrongs that blocked salmon from the Upper Columbia River, but it shares the current efforts by UCUT and other tribes (US) and First Nations (Canada) to bring forward tribal traditions to help better understand what is lacking in our contemporary society. We need to forge a deeper connection to the waters that bring life to our communities.

The film comes at a critical time as the US government has begun renegotiating the Columbia River Treaty and indigenous nations are advocating to the U.S. State Department their rightful place at the negotiation table to give voice to the Columbia River, salmon, and people of the river.

Partners of this film screening include the Upper Columbia United Tribes, Center for Environmental Law and Policy, Sierra Club’s Columbia River Future Project, Save Our Wild Salmon, Columbia Institute for Water Policy, and the Backbone Campaign.  Admission is by donation to the Backbone Campaign, with no one turned away for lack of funds.   Proceeds will help go to support the Tribes’ River Warriors project.

Film co-sponsored by:

 

 

 


Remembering Vanport Flood’s double tragedy

News Release: May 23, 2018

4:05 p.m. Memorial Day: A moment of silence to remember the double tragedy of the Vanport Flood

Canadians, impacted by resulting Treaty, ask Americans to rethink flood risk management in the lower Columbia River Basin

Canadian-United States Treaty Negotiations to start May 29 – the day following Vanport Flood memorial

Reporter Contacts:

Without warning, on Memorial Day 1948, a combination of heavy winter snowfall, warm temperatures, and spring rainfall sent torrents down the Columbia River, breaking through a railroad embankment serving as a levee, and destroying Oregon’s second largest city, Vanport, near Portland. Built in the floodplain of the Columbia River close to the confluence with the Willamette River, Vanport provided housing for thousands of low-income people. The floodwaters killed at least fifteen people, left 18,000 others homeless, and washed away the community.

The governments of the United States and Canada seized on the Vanport flood to promote a treaty that would authorize dams upstream in British Columbia and Montana, eventually forcing thousands of residents from their homes, and permanently flooding vast river valleys of the Upper Columbia River Basin. Particularly devastating for indigenous people who had lived in the Columbia River Valley for thousands of years was loss of burial grounds and cultural sites, compounding the loss of massive salmon runs caused by Grand Coulee dam. And now, on the 70th anniversary of the Vanport Flood, the United States and Canada are entering into negotiations to modernize that agreement known as the Columbia River Treaty.

“Recognizing the double tragedy impacting thousands of people in Vanport and subsequently in our Canadian and First Nations communities in the Upper Columbia River, we ask for a moment of silence on Memorial Day,” said Mindy Smith, a physician living near Trail, British Columbia. “We also ask that each Memorial Day going forward, we pause to remember and reflect on this double disaster and how people of the Basin are bound together by more than a treaty, but by our need and responsibility to seek equity of benefits and costs in river management.”

The Vanport Flood and its devastating consequences for the upper Columbia River Basin was the focus of a 2016 conference, One River – Ethics Matter, hosted by the University of Portland. This was part of the conference series of Columbia River reconciliation based on the 2001 Columbia River Pastoral Letter by the Roman Catholic Bishops of the international watershed. Highlights of the Portland conference focusing on the Vanport Flood can be viewed on a short film: Portland: One River – Ethics Matter.

“As negotiators for the United States and Canada prepare to sit down to discuss the future of the River, the double tragedy of the Vanport Flood needs to be remembered,” said Martin Carver of Nelson B.C. and coordinator of the Upper Columbia Basin Environmental Collaborative. “With continued floodplain development in the Portland area and elsewhere, and with escalating risks from climate change, the scope of the floodplain problem going forward will only increase.   Americans should not continue to rely on the devastation of upstream ecosystems and communities to allow for downstream floodplain development in Portland. That is fundamentally unjust and cannot be sustained.”

“The Columbia River is one river and ethics matter,” said John Osborn, physician and coordinator of the Columbia River Roundtable. “Past decisions have located people and structures in harm’s way by building in downriver floodplains while permanently flooding upriver valleys with dams and reservoirs – once biologically and culturally rich river valleys now wastelands. The Treaty dams are not going away. But we need to rethink dam management to improve river health and restore salmon runs while protecting communities. That is a compelling legacy of the Vanport Flood double tragedy.”

The moment of silence is scheduled for 4:05p.m. PDT on Memorial Day (U.S.)   The next day, May 29, in Washington D.C., the United States and Canada will begin formal negotiations to modernize the Columbia River Treaty. (link)

Links:

 

Vanport, Oregon – photo from BlackPast.org

 

 


Icicle Creek: a win for waters of Washington

News Release:  May 18, 2018

Fish Hatchery polluting Icicle Creek at center of ruling allowing Washington State to protect state waters

Contacts –

  • Dan Von Seggern, Center for Environmental Law & Policy (CELP),  dvonseggern@celp.org  206.829-8299
  • Kurt Beardslee, Wild Fish Conservancy, kurt@wildfishconservancy.org 425-788-1167

On May 14 the Washington Pollution Control Hearings Board (PCHB) ruled against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), operator of the Leavenworth Fish Hatchery, and in favor of Icicle Creek advocates Center for Environmental Law & Policy (CELP) and Wild Fish Conservancy. Late last year, CELP and Wild Fish Conservancy appealed the state’s certification under Section 401 of the Clean Water Act for the federal hatchery to the PCHB. The FWS asked the PCHB to dismiss the appeal, arguing that state water quality certifications are not independently enforceable and cannot be effectively modified after a federal permit is issued, and therefore the challenge to the state certification was moot. The PCHB rejected the FWS argument. The PCHB concluded that state-issued Section 401 certifications are tailored to protect water quality in every state water body and are independently enforceable.

“This decision is a victory for protecting Washington’s waters,” said Dan Von Seggern, CELP staff attorney. “It affirms the State’s ability under the Clean Water Act to place meaningful conditions on a water user even where a Federal permit has been issued. The decision allows CELP and other water advocates to work through the courts to enforce these conditions.”

Icicle Creek flows out of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness through the Bavarian-themed town of Leavenworth, Washington, and supports important fisheries including endangered Chinook salmon and threatened steelhead.

“We commend the PCHB’s ruling against the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery,” said Kurt Beardslee, director of Wild Fish Conservancy. “We believe State and Federal government facilities should be a positive example of environmental stewardship for the rest of the community. Unfortunately, this hatchery is not a good neighbor and has set a poor example. It is in fact the largest polluter of Icicle Creek.”

The Leavenworth National Hatchery was first constructed between 1939 and 1941 near Leavenworth, Washington, as a mitigation project for Grand Coulee dam. It is located on the banks of Icicle Creek approximately three miles from the confluence with the Wenatchee River. The hatchery has a long history of violating state and federal environmental laws, despite repeated attempts to bring it into compliance to protect Icicle Creek.

Wild Fish Conservancy and CELP are represented by Kampmeier & Knutsen, PLLC of Portland, OR.

Link:

Background

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) discharges a wide variety of pollutants into Icicle Creek from the federal hatchery located near Leavenworth, Washington. Pollutants released from the Hatchery to Icicle Creek include disease control chemicals, pathogens, nitrogen, phosphorus, antibiotics, chemicals used for disinfection and other fish culture purposes, residual chemical reagents, salts, and chlorinated water. The excess phosphorus discharged by the Hatchery has caused violations of the applicable water quality criterion for pH in lower Icicle Creek. This phosphorus loading also contributes to violations of water quality standards in the Wenatchee River.

The Clean Water Act is the main mechanism through which pollution of our waters is prevented, and the Hatchery is obligated to apply for a permit and to operate according to its conditions.

A National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit is required by the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) and would place limits on pollutant discharges. States, using “401 certifications,” can compel the federal government to protect state waters. On July 28, 2017, the Washington Department of Ecology issued a draft Clean Water Act section 401 certification for a new permit. State certifications must include appropriate limitations and monitoring requirements to assure that the applicant for the Federal permit (USFWS) will comply with applicable effluent limits, prohibitions, standards of performance and appropriate requirements of state law.

For 37 years, the FWS operated the Leavenworth Fish Hatchery without a valid permit in violation of the Clean Water Act. On November 22, 2017 both a new federal permit and state 401 certification were issued. On December 21, CELP and Native Fish Conservancy appealed the state 401 certification to the PCHB. The federal permit was not appealed, and took effect on January 1, 2018. USFWS asked the PCHB to dismiss the appeal because Icicle Creek advocates had appealed the state certification, but not the federal permit.


Conservation Groups petition to end Enloe Dam Hydropower License

American Whitewater * Columbiana * Center for Environmental Law & Policy * Sierra Club

News Release – March 16, 2018

Contacts:

Salmon jumping, Similkameen River, Enloe dam. (Photo: Colton Miller, July 2014)

River advocacy groups filed a petition in federal court today against the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) challenging its recent decision to extend construction deadlines on the Enloe Hydroelectric Project on the Similkameen River in north central Washington. Through the petition the groups seek to ensure FERC complies with clear requirements of the Federal Power Act and allows for meaningful public participation when making its decisions.

Despite strong local opposition, the Okanogan Public Utility District (OPUD) is currently seeking to re-energize Enloe Dam, which has sat dormant in the Similkameen River since 1958. Multiple economic analyses show that power generated by the project will cost far more than electricity from other sources, burdening ratepayers that live in one of the most economically disadvantaged counties in Washington. The PUD’s project would also divert the Similkameen River and dewater the culturally, ecologically and recreationally significant Similkameen (a.k.a “Coyote”) Falls downstream.

“As energy from wind and solar increase in the Pacific Northwest, and with an already abundant hydropower supply in the region, the power from Enloe isn’t necessary,” said Thomas O’Keefe, Pacific Northwest Stewardship Director with American Whitewater. Noting that the PUD recently entered into an agreement to purchase power from Wells Dam for as long as it needs the power, O’Keefe added, “the Similkameen River is a valuable resource to the region for recreation, scenic values, and fish and wildlife. We believe there’s more value in restoring the river to enhance these values.”

The OPUD project would divert and dewater the Similkameen River and Coyote Falls. (Simulation:  Dr. Doug Whittaker)

Coyote Falls, Enloe dam. The waterfalls is an increasingly important regional attraction because of an expanding local and regional trail system, and salmon can be seen swimming above the waterfalls to the base of the dam. (Photo:  Hydropower Reform Coalition)

“OPUD faces a great deal of uncertainty about whether the project will be economically sound,” said John Osborn, physician and coordinator of Sierra Club’s Columbia River Future Project. “The PUD is required to do an aesthetic flow study but still plans to wait until after the project is built, meaning it will not know how much water it will be able to divert to generate power until it has sunk tens of millions of dollars into designing and building the project. It’s more compelling to restore the river. Coyote Falls is an increasingly important regional attraction because of an expanding local and regional trail system, and salmon can be seen swimming above waterfalls to the base of the dam.”

The petition challenges FERC’s 2018 decision to grant the PUD additional time to begin construction on the Enloe project. The Federal Power Act allows FERC to extend construction deadlines just once, which it did for OPUD in 2015. In anticipation of missing its July 9, 2017 deadline, OPUD filed a request that FERC further delay the deadline by granting a “stay.” FERC granted the request, and denied conservation groups’ attempts to have a formal say in the matter. The groups contend that FERC violated the law when it granted the PUD additional time to begin construction.

“OPUD’s FERC license allows it to operate Enloe until 2063,” said Jere Gillespie of Columbiana. “To avoid red ink, OPUD will have no choice but to pass the costs along to the ratepayers into the next generation. What makes sense for the Similkameen and for ratepayers is to free the river of this cement plug and not throw good money after bad. A free flowing Similkameen will enhance economic growth for the local community.”

The groups note that they have been and remain willing to work with the PUD to develop a path forward for restoring the river that addresses ecological and cultural issues and the economic concern for ratepayers.

The petition was filed today in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which provides appellate review of the decisions by FERC. The petitioners are American Whitewater, Center for Environmental Law & Policy, Columbiana, and Sierra Club. Andrew Hawley and Pete Frost of the Western Environmental Law Center represent the Similkameen River advocates.

# # #


Honoring Ethical Journalism

News Advisory – Feb 19, 2018

Three Journalists to be honored, thanked in Spokane

Karen Dorn Steele, Rich Landers, Julie Titone reported over decades on water, forests, wildlife habitats, and cleaning up pollution in the Upper Columbia River Basin

Contacts:

When:  March 2 (Friday) 6:30 p.m. – 9:30

Where:  Spokane – historic Patsy Clark Mansion, 2208 W. 2nd Ave

What:  Honoring our environmental heroes – also music, desserts and other small foods, wines

Tickets: $35 per person. People are asked to RSVP. Tickets can be purchased at the door or on-line at CELP.org

Interviews with Karen Dorn Steele, Rich Landers, Julie Titone will be available prior to the March 2 honoring event.  Please send requests to john@waterplanet.ws

Why we honor journalism in the Upper Columbia River Region

Three retired journalists – Julie Titone, Rich Landers, and Karen Dorn Steele – who contributed significantly to our understanding of the world in which we live, will receive the Watershed Hero Award on March 2 at the Patsy Clark Mansion. In this time of attacks on journalism, we hope that you will attend and join us for Honoring Ethical Journalism.  Here is a thumbnail sketch of each of these heroes:

Karen Dorn Steele – Investigative Journalist

The Hanford Nuclear Reservation is one of the world’s most polluted places and also a place of historic importance. Radioactive discharges into the air and groundwater have profound consequences, threatening the Columbia River region. The nationally acclaimed investigative reporting of Karen Dorn Steele opened our eyes to these threats.

Karen’s reporting connected us with the lives of our rural neighbors struggling with cancer deaths and other destructive impacts because of decisions to pollute the air, land, and water. More broadly, Karen’s reporting helped us to better recognize the importance of justice and stewardship in decisions about our region, including cleaning up massive mining and smelting pollution of the Upper Columbia River region.

Rich Landers – Outdoor Writer

Spokane is near the center of the Columbia River Basin, and Rich Landers brought the stories of the rivers, special places and outdoor pursuits into our homes and our lives.  Rich blazed a trail so that others could follow. He opened our eyes and our minds.

Conservation was a thread woven through Rich’s articles and photos. He was uniquely instrumental in the Upper Columbia River region in helping bring together hunters, anglers, outdoor recreation enthusiasts, and environmentalists to recognize their common interest in protecting clean, flowing rivers and habitat for fish and wildlife.

Julie Titone – Environmental Reporter

Through Julie Titone’s writing we learned about threats to our region’s waters and opportunities to engage in decisions to sustain and protect rivers and forests. She gave voice to the voiceless, including wildlife, rivers, and tribes struggling with a legacy of mining and smelting pollution.

In a time of historic transition and the consequent conflict over water and forests, Julie Titone’s reporting for the Columbia River Basin can best be described as “healing journalism”: respectful written dialogue allowing people to better understand issues and each other that empowered our regional community to recognize the finite limits of water and forests.

More about Honoring Journalism

Beginning in the 1980s, the Inland Northwest has undergone a series of historic transitions with the closing of frontiers – timber, mining, and now water – brought on by exploitation and limits of the natural world. Critical reporting on the environment is essential to sustaining and restoring the rivers and economies that depend on them in the Columbia Basin.

In the face of widespread corporate and foreign national meddling in our political discourse via social media and the proliferation of “fake news,” it is vital that the honorable work of journalists dedicated to truth and the common good be recognized and applauded.

Today as in every age, but particularly confronted as we are with the speed and quantity of what passes as news, we need reporters who not only are able to write a winsome phrase and paint a convincing verbal picture of our wildlife and landscapes, but who also love the earth and seek to support and honor its intricate web of life.

The work of these three journalists has contributed to a just and intelligent public expectation of what is acceptable in a human-nature ethic. Their journalism has held public and private officials to higher standards, and perhaps most importantly, these three reporters are a continuing example for others in the face of attacks on journalism and the environment.

Winter Waters Celebration is jointly hosted by Sierra Club’s Upper Columbia River Group and CELP to recognize and honor individuals, tribes, and organizations who have contributed significantly to protecting and restoring the waters of the Upper Columbia River.  Winter Waters 2018 is the 10th annual honoring event.

 


“Hirst fix” bill bad for streams, salmon

Contact:

“Hirst fix” bill will harm streams, fish, and senior water users

Democratic majority fails to stand up to minority Republicans and protect rivers and salmon.

Seattle – The Washington Legislature today passed a sweeping permit-exempt well bill (SB 6091, the “Hirst fix”) that will have dire consequences for Washington’s endangered salmon and the people who depend on them. Most of our state’s rivers and streams are already imperiled due to low streamflows. It is well-established that pumping groundwater, including unregulated water withdrawals by “permit-exempt” wells, reduces streamflow. Rural development using permit-exempt wells has been happening at an accelerating pace, taking more and more water from streams and other senior users.

The 2016 Whatcom County v. Hirst decision was not new law. Hirst simply reaffirmed that new wells may not impair more senior water users, including instream flows. Special interests including the building industry and real estate agents pressured the Legislature to ignore the science and “fix” the decision so that rural sprawl could continue unimpeded. Today, Legislative Democrats gave in to that pressure. While this bill is styled as a “fix,” its real effect will be to allow more and more unmitigated water use. The results are predictable: lower streamflows, higher water temperatures, and fewer fish in the rivers.

Methods for mitigating water use and avoiding impacts on streamflows are well-established, and indeed are in use in several parts of the state. But the bill does not require mitigation; it provides for “watershed preservation and enhancement committees” which will develop projects to “offset water use by permit-exempt wells.” While well-intentioned, the committee process is unlikely to lead to fully mitigating water use. Worse yet, the bill fails to meaningfully limit water use or even to provide for metering of water use, so that we will never know how much water is actually being used. It is almost inevitable that senior users and rivers will be harmed.

Another provision of the bill is even more troubling: it calls for “pilot projects” allowing water to be taken from streams and mitigated using so-called “out-of-kind” mitigation (generally stream-related habitat projects) rather than actually protecting streamflows. This is especially egregious because this provision is not even aimed at Hirst, but at another decision holding that streamflows must be protected (Foster v. Ecology). Out of kind mitigation sets the stage for a huge water giveaway, with serious consequences to streams and fish.

“The best habitat in the world is worthless if there is not enough water in the streams,” said Dan Von Seggern, staff attorney for CELP. “As mitigation water becomes harder to find, it is inevitable that “out-of-kind” mitigation will become the path of least resistance. Ecology needs to live up to its obligation to protect instream resources by carefully monitoring the watershed committees and the “offset” schemes they develop.”

“We are disappointed in leadership in the Legislature that has allowed the capital budget to be held hostage to an issue that has nothing to do with the budget. This agreement will harm fish, senior water right holders, and tribes. We expected better” said Trish Rolfe, CELP’s Executive Director.

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Negotiating Columbia River Treaty to begin in early 2018

Conservation, fishing and faith groups applaud announcement

December 11, 2017  –  For Immediate Release

Contact:

  • Greg Haller, Conservation Director at Pacific Rivers   greg@pacificrivers.org
  • Joseph Bogaard, Executive Director at Save our Wild Salmon Coalition  joseph@wildsalmon.org

On December 7th the U.S. Department of State announced that formal negotiations with Canada over the fate of the fifty-three year old U.S.-Canada Columbia River Treaty will begin in early 2018.

A broad coalition of conservation, fishing and religious organizations representing hundreds of thousands of Pacific Northwest residents, hailed the announcement.

“Conservation and fishing groups are encouraged that the two countries are moving forward with Treaty negotiations. Modernizing the Treaty to improve the health of the river and communities on both sides of the border is not just an opportunity, but also a critical need given the challenges salmon face in the 21st century,” said Samantha (Sam) Mace of the Save Our wild Salmon Coalition.

The Columbia River Treaty was originally ratified in 1964 to reduce the risk of floods in downstream cities like Portland, Oregon and to develop additional hydropower capacity. The Treaty accomplished these goals through the construction of three large storage reservoirs in British Columbia (Duncan, Mica and Keenleyside), which added 15.5 million acre-feet of storage capacity. Canada built Mica Dam larger than the Treaty required, adding another 5 million acre feet of non-Treaty storage for power production.

The Treaty also spurred the construction of Libby Dam in Montana, which added an additional 5 million acre feet flood storage space and hydropower capacity. All told, these projects doubled the storage capacity of the basin – and dramatically reduced the river’s natural spring flows. Notably, consideration of the health of the Columbia River and its fish and wildlife populations were not included in the original Treaty. Not only did the construction of the dams result in the displacement of people, economies and cultures as a result of permanently flooded lands, it had a profound effect on salmon and other fish and wildlife species – and the communities that rely on them – on both sides of the border.

While the Treaty has no formal end date, provisions that govern joint flood risk management operations are set to expire in 2024, which would have major ramifications for how reservoirs in the U.S. part of the basin are managed.  Additionally, U.S.-based utilities are keen to reduce the amount of power they deliver to Canada each year as required by the Treaty.

Conservation, fishing and faith organizations, on the other hand, view the pending negotiations as an opportunity to include “ecosystem-based function” – or health of the river – as a formal component of a modernized Treaty, on equal footing with flood risk management and hydropower production. Including ecosystem-based function would mean improved river flows to aid salmon’s out-migration to the ocean and improve water quality. It would also mean improved fish passage and reintroduction of salmon and steelhead into areas made inaccessible to salmon by dams in the U.S. and Canada.

Treaty modernization also creates an opportunity to improve the governance of the Treaty to allow a more transparent and inclusive process for negotiations and implementation.

“The Columbia River Treaty is often hailed as a model of transboundary river management. Adding ecosystem-based function and ensuring the governance of the river is transparent and inclusive will truly make the Treaty a model for international river management in the 21st Century”, said Greg Haller of Pacific Rivers. “We aim to prod both countries to achieve that goal.”

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U.S. State Department:

Modernizing the Columbia River Treaty Regime

  • Media Note
  • Office of the Spokesperson
  • Washington, DC
  • December 7, 2017

The United States and Canada will begin negotiations to modernize the landmark Columbia River Treaty regime in early 2018. Certain provisions of the Treaty—a model of transboundary natural resource cooperation since 1964—are set to expire in 2024.

The Columbia River’s drainage basin is roughly the size of France and includes parts of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming, and British Columbia. The Treaty’s flood risk and hydropower operations provide substantial benefits to millions of people on both sides of the border. The Treaty has also facilitated additional benefits such as supporting the river’s ecosystem, irrigation, municipal water use, industrial use, navigation, and recreation.

For further information, please email WHAPress@state.gov.

https://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2017/12/276354.htm