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Washington Water Watch: May 2019

Dear friends of CELP,

As you may have heard, Governor Inslee declared an emergency drought declaration back in early April. Since then, he has expanded that declaration to nearly half of the state. Poor water supply conditions and warmer and drier weather predictions through the summer have us extremely worried. 

Snow pack conditions are less than 50% of the average for this time of year, and the Washington State Department of Ecology is expecting a warmer and drier summer than in year than years prior. All this makes CELP’s work more critical than ever, but our work would not be possible without supporters like you. We rely on generous donations from our members and supporters to hold our lawmakers and agencies accountable for protecting Washington’s rivers and streams.  Renew your membership today on our secure website. In this issue you will find information about this year’s Summer CLE, Celebrate Water, CELP’s involvement in your community, and a legislative wrap up highlighting some wins for water laws in the most recent legislative session.  

Sincerely, 
Trish Rolfe
Executive Director
trolfe@celp.org

View the full report here: https://conta.cc/2EH1UAF


CELP Presents: Water Stories

Photo by Colin Wiseman

Leading up to our biggest event of the year – Celebrate Water – we will be highlighting Washington residents from across the state and their intrinsic connections to Washington’s diverse waters. These heartfelt, personal celebrations of water will together, highlight the vital importance of healthy amounts of clean, flowing water in our communities.

Our first “Water Story” will be published on our social media profiles & website on June 10th. View the stories HERE!

Celebrate Water is June 20th! For more info & tickets – visit: https://celebratewater2019.bpt.me


GiveBIG 2019

Give Big takes place on May 8, 2019

 

Big news! CELP is participating in Give Big once again. The one-day online giving campaign will support your local non-profits in their efforts to make Washington an even better place to live. During the 24 hour giving window on Wednesday May 8th, we encourage you to not only help protect Washington’s waters by giving to CELP, but to explore the hundreds of other non-profit organizations that are working towards shaping the future of our state.

 

This year is shaping up to be a critical year for water in Washington, as the Department of Ecology just declared a drought in three watersheds: The Upper Yakima, Okanogan, and Methow. This could be bad news for fish and our population of Resident Orca’s.

 

March was unprecedentedly dry, and it is likely to only get worse from here. The coming months are forecast to be warmer and drier than normal, putting more and more areas around the state at risk. The warmer the summers get with Climate Change; the more frequently droughts are likely to occur. The only way we can proactively combat this is to start planning now and encourage the state to prioritize sound sustainable water policy. All this makes CELP’s work more critical than ever, but our work would not be possible without supporters like you. We rely on our generous donations from our members and supporters to hold our lawmakers and agencies accountable for protecting Washington’s rivers and streams.

 

To participate in this years GiveBIG click here.

 

Simple.  Effective. Giving.


Join CELP at the Southwest Washington Fair!

Since 1909, the Southwest Washington fair in Chehalis has drawn crowds from all over the state to play, compete, eat, and learn. Whether you want to rock out to the all-female AC/DC cover band “Hells Belles,” test your luck on the carnival rides, feast on a variety of fried breads, admire the livestock and harvests from farmers all over Washington, or learn from a variety of informational and fun exhibits, we would love to see you there!

The fair runs from August 14 to 19, and CELP will be operating a booth in the exposition building Thursday, August 16 to Sunday, August 19. We will be talking with folks about protecting their water resources and building support behind establishing instream flows in Southwest Washington (more information on instream flows can be found under “water programs”). There are 11 free tickets available for anyone who would like to volunteer to come down and help with the booth, as well as parking passes and camping spots.

If you would like to help promote sustainable water management while also experiencing one of Washington’s most iconic gatherings, please email Nick Manning at nmanning@celp.org. We hope to see you there!


Celebrate Water 2018 Successes: Thank You!

Thanks to our sponsors and all our supporters who attended Celebrate Water this year! We had a wonderful time at Ivar’s once again this year commemorating yet another successful year of CELP’s work to preserve, protect and restore Washington’s water resources. And special thank you to our CLE presenter, Robert T. Anderson, for educating us on the Culvert Case!

We were thrilled to honor Sara Foster, Laura Leigh Brakke, David Stalheim, Eric Hirst and Wendy Harris with the Ralph W. Johnson Water Hero Award for their activism in the Hirst and Foster Supreme Court Cases. Their diligence ultimately resulted in improved protections and management of Washington’s rivers and streams by the Department of Ecology. Our honorees began as concerned citizens, and the wins they secured in the Washington Supreme Court would not have been possible with the collective dedication and involvement of these five individuals. Thank you, again, to our five honorees for their contributions towards ensuring future generations have access to clean and flowing water in Washington!

Ralph W. Johnson awardees & CELP Board members. R to L: Eric Hirst, Wendy Harris, Jean Melious, Laura Leigh Brakke, David Stalheim, Sara Foster and Patrick Williams.

Thank you to our many sponsors for their support, including Adidas Outdoor, Kampmeier & Knutsen PLLC, Smith & Lowney PLLC, Wright Yachts, Columbia Institute for Water PolicySouth Sound Group Sierra Club, Deschutes Estuary Restoration TeamLaw Offices of M. Patrick Williams and Olympia Urban Waters League.


Washington Water Watch: November Edition

In this issue, an article on recent victory in court on the Leavenworth Hatchery Clean Water Act Case, a story on CELP’s founding director, Rachael Osborn, being recognized by AWRA-WA with their award for Outstanding Contribution to Water Resources, a welcome to CELP’s newest staff member, Emma Kilkelly, information about our December CLE, and more.

Read the November edition of Washington Water Watch here.


Washington Water Watch: June 2017 Edition

In this issue, find pictures of our recent Celebrate Water event, an update on the Spokane River rule, links to CELP’s Columbia River Treaty media and document library, and an opportunity to speak up for the Hanford Reach National Monument!

Read the June issue of Water Watch here.


Washington Water Watch: May 2017 Edition

In this issue, read about our upcoming Celebrate Water event and a bio of the Ralph Johnson awardee, John Osborn, meet our summer legal intern, learn about our latest victory on Icicle Creek, a recap on the Revelstoke, B.C. One River – Ethics Matter conference, and enjoy an update on the culvert case!

Read the May issue of Water Watch here.


Revelstoke B.C. hosts 4th annual One River – Ethics Matter conference

“The River is sacred.  People will put aside their differences when it comes to the River and bringing back the salmon.”
– the late Virgil Seymour (1958 – 2016) Arrow Lakes (Sinixt) Facilitator for The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

The May 13 “One River – Ethics Matter” conference opened with a welcome and call from Revelstoke’s Mayor, Mark McKee, for all people to work together on behalf of the Columbia River.  The day was truly remarkable for bringing together Upper Columbia River Basin’s First Nations, religious leaders, and community leaders and volunteers in respectful dialogue on the past and future of the Columbia River.

Free-flowing Columbia River, at Revelstoke B.C. – site of the 4th in the series of international conferences, “One River – Ethics Matter.” Prior conferences were held in Spokane, Portland, and Boise. In 2018, the fifth conference will be in Montana.

Some of the more memorable messages:

  • We do this work – returning the salmon and restoring the waters of the Upper Columbia – for our kids.
  • Indigenous people have been here from time immemorial, and we’ll continue to be here forever.
  • Churches and houses of worship are also symbols of community – and destroying or moving churches with the Treaty dams underscored the wrenching impacts on the people of the Upper Columbia.
  • Indigenous language carries meaning that is deeply important.
  • C. public schools have made major advances in environmental education.
  • All of us need more water rituals in our daily lives.
  • We all need to work together for the River and return of salmon.

First Nation and tribal leadership included Bonnie Leonard (Secwepemc), Sandra Luke (Ktunaxa), Chief Chad Eneas and Rosalie Wilson-Yazzie (Okanagan Nation Alliance), and D.R. Michel (Sinixt, Upper Columbia United Tribes), along with policy experts Bill Green (Canadian Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fisheries Commission) and Jay Johnson (Okanagan Nation Alliance).

Faith leadership included Anglican Archbishop John Privett, Roman Catholic Bishop John Corriveau, and Rev. Greg Powell of the Kootenay Presbytery.

Scholars and educators included Jeannette Armstrong (En’owkin Centre, Syilx scholar), Angus Graeme (President, Selkirk College), and Ariel McDowell (Principal of Aboriginal Education, School District 19).

This is the fourth in a conference series entitled “One River – Ethics Matter” that examines the moral dimensions of the dam-building era with a focus on First Nations (Canada) and Indian tribes (U.S.), and the river and life that depends on the river.

Earlier conferences explored the profound effects of dams from Grand Coulee upstream on tribes and First Nations; how protecting flood plain settlement and development in the Portland area has come at the cost of permanently flooding river valleys and native homelands upstream; and re-licensing of Idaho Power Company’s Hells Canyon Complex of dams to provide passage for salmon now blocked from returning to the upper Snake River.  The Revelstoke conference focused on the catastrophic change that came with permanently flooding the immense river valleys of interior British Columbia as part of the Columbia River Treaty ratified in 1964.

The One River – Ethics Matter conference series is coordinated by the Ethics & Treaty Project.  The project is jointly hosted by CELP and Sierra Club.

Additional Revelstoke Links

Revelstoke Conference hosts:

North Columbia Environmental Society, Mir Centre for Peace, Selkirk College, Okanagan College Faculty Association

Revelstoke Conference sponsors:

Joan Craig, MD * Roman Catholic Diocese of Nelson * Archbishop John Privett, Anglican Diocese of Kootenay * Ktunaxa Nation Council * Upper Columbia United Tribes * Laurie Arnold PhD * North Columbia Environmental Society * Sierra Club BC * Yellowstone to Yukon * Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, Southwestern Washington Synod * Citizens for a Clean Columbia * Columbia Institute for Water Policy * Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, Washington State Chapter * Sierra Club, Washington State Chapter * Tom Soeldner & Linda Finney * Center for Environmental Law & Policy * Rachael & John Osborn

 


Washington Water Watch: February Edition

Check out CELP’s February edition of Washington Water Watch! In this issue: an update on water legislation making its way through the State Legislature, an article on the Grays-Elochoman & Cowlitz watersheds, and updates on our upcoming events.

Read the February issue of Water Watch here.