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Washington Water Watch: November Addition

Photo: Kayla Jo Media

Dear friends of CELP,


As the year winds down, the state drought declaration for 27 watersheds remains in effect, expiring April 4th, 2020.  As winter approaches, snowpack levels continue to be less than average. These levels are critical to water supplies and replenishing aquifers. Our rivers and streams are already struggling to meet minimum instream flows, and climate change is further impacting our water supplies.


That’s why CELP has been working to protect and restore stream flows in watersheds around the state – work that is now more critical than ever. But we can’t do it alone. We rely on generous donations from our members and supporters to hold our lawmakers and agencies accountable for protecting Washington’s rivers and streams. Please consider helping us continue this important work by making a donation today!


In this issue, you will find information about the South Puget Sound chum run, CELP in the community, #GivingTuesday, and our Winter Continuing Legal Education workshop.

 Sincerely, 

Trish Rolfe

Executive Director

trolfe@celp.org

For Full Newsletter: https://conta.cc/2XEAEer


Remembering Pat Sumption

John & Rachael Osborn:

First, let us thank Pat’s three sons – David, Cameron, and Chris – especially for helping their mother in the last part of her life’s journey.

Pat Sumption was a consummate environmental activist. She was dauntless, persistent, strategic, and unerring in her sense of the right thing to do, especially for Washington’s rivers. She worked for decades for the protection of the Green River, including standing up to Tacoma’s ever-thirsty water grab through the infamous Pipeline Five.

Rachael uncovered an essay Pat herself had written and published in the Center for Environmental Law & Policy (CELP) newsletter in 2016. Here are Pat’s words from “Love Letter to the Green River”:


I didn’t mean to fall in love with the Green River. It just happened. It just grew like Topsy.

I discovered rivers when I went to Girl Scout camp at 12. We did a multi-day hike on the Dosewallips. We swam in the river and nearly froze our toes, and it was beautiful and I was in love with the Dosewallips and rivers everywhere. So it was inevitable when someone aimed me at a river canoe, that I would get in it and try paddling. And, I guess it was inevitable when I was told to choose my favorite Washington river at a State Rivers Conference in the 1980’s, that I would choose the Green. It is the color of my eyes, after all, and I had to choose something.

All those at the Conference who chose the Green (even if their eyes weren’t), were sent to one corner and told that our task was to form a Green River group which would then work on protecting our chosen River. There must have been other fanatics in our Group, because we did just that: we formed Friends of the Green River and started raising money and incorporating a non-profit. And the more I did for the Green, the more I fell in love with it.

The Green River has a secret that gets many people hooked on it. Part of it is hidden in a deep, quiet gorge that’s almost inaccessible except by boat. Boaters come from all over the world to boat the Green River Gorge. It’s untrammeled, pristine, gorgeously draped in damp green mosses and ferns – a fantasy, watery, world of Green.

But, the Green River has 2 dams on it. The Corps of Engineers built a dam for flood control in the middle of the 20th Century. Tacoma then built a smaller dam downstream . . . [to pipe] Green River water to municipal customers in Pierce County.

Those dams meant problems for the ecology of the Green, and for recreational boaters. They were threats to the salmon and steelhead runs of the Green River; there was no fish passage for either dam.

By the 1980s, Tacoma had plans to build a new water supply pipeline through south King County rather than directly to Pierce County and Tacoma, because they wanted to sell some of that water to the water districts and towns in south King County along the way.

Friends of the Green River (FOG) had been created to protect the Green and its watershed, including not allowing more water to be taken from the River. FOG appealed … the permits to build the new Pipeline through King County where it would cross a number of streams, wetlands, etc. …

We eventually … negotiated with Tacoma and a 1995 Agreement gave us a number of things that could help the Green River, its habitat, its salmon and perhaps even its white water boaters. …

Remember, it takes a community to care for a river and its watershed.


And this from Elaine Packard, friend and colleague in advocacy for Washington’s rivers:

“Pat was a longstanding member of the Sierra Club’s Water & Salmon Committee which she chaired for a time. For decades, she was one of its most dedicated members, serving as activist, as well as mentor and advisor. And Pat brought institutional memory along with her expertise about water. Anyone who worked to protect rivers in Washington: she knew them and she’d probably worked with them.

Pat’s training as a lawyer gave her a laser mind on issues. But it was her love of rivers that inspired her to serve in many leadership roles with Sierra Club, Friends of the Green River, CELP, Rivers Council, and other groups. She will be missed and remembered fondly for her commitment, her persistence, and her special charm. She was a respected elder in the Chapter whose memory will not be forgotten.”


In closing, rivers and future generations, depend on us to give them a voice. Pat gave voice to rivers.

On the day before Pat’s life celebration, Rachael and I sat and talked about Pat. How is it that someone with such a powerful presence can be among us on one day, and then be gone the next? Where are they? Where did they go?

Flowing through forests and human communities in western Washington is the Green River. Pat may be gone. Pat’s spirit? Pat remains with the river she so deeply loves. Let Pat’s love and work for rivers carry on through all of us.


Washington Water Watch: September Addition

Check out our newest Washington Water Watch newsletter:

Photo: John Osborn

Dear friends of CELP,


Summer is winding down, and hopefully most of you got a chance to get out and enjoy the wonderful recreational opportunities on our rivers. But sadly, those opportunities were limited in some areas of the state due to low river flows caused by this year’s drought. Climate Change is contributing to an increase in the frequency and severity of droughts in our state, and state policies need to do more to proactively combat this. Other threats continue to pop up like the proposed Crystal Geyser water bottling plant in Randal next to the Cowlitz River, a river that doesn’t have the protection of an Instream Flow Rule. 


That’s why CELP has been working to protect and restore stream flows in watersheds around the state – work that is now more critical than ever. But we can’t do it alone. We rely on generous donations from our members and supporters to hold our lawmakers and agencies accountable for protecting Washington’s rivers and streams. Please consider helping us continue this important work by making a donation today!


In this issue you will find information about CELP’s win on the Spokane River Instream Flow Rule, CELP in the community, the Crystal Geyser water bottling plant proposal, salmon in the Upper Columbia River, a thank you to the Swinomish, and an AWRA event announcement.  

Sincerely, Trish
Trish Rolfe
Executive Director
trolfe@celp.org

For the full newsletter – click here: https://conta.cc/32CvW2n


More Controversy Stirs: Crystal Geyser Bottling Plant Proposal

Crystal Geyser submitted a proposal for a water bottling plant in Randle, Washington that is planning to take 325,000 gallons a day out of the Cowlitz river watershed if its permit is approved by Ecology. This has huge implications for water quality, quantity, critical fish habitat, and land use.

Take a listen to this short segment on the most recent slip-up in the Crystal Geyser bottling plant proposal. Thanks, KUOW-FM for the informative look into what has been going on, as well as the concerns of Randle citizens and others around the state.


July Drought Update

Summer officially began a few weeks ago and Washingtonians are now out hiking, camping and enjoying all the outdoors activities our state has to offer. But this warm, dry weather comes with frightening prospects for Washington’s rivers and streams. As you may have heard, Governor Inslee declared an emergency drought back in early April and since then he has expanded it to over half of the state. Snowpack conditions are less than 50% of the average for this time of year, and 83% of our rivers and streams are flowing well below normal with many experiencing record lows.  

The Naches River flows low as it feeds into the Yakima – Washington State Department of Ecology.

This is not good news for Washington’s rivers and the fish that depend on them. Statewide, more than two dozen salmon populations are listed as endangered, and this year’s drought could cause these salmon populations to dwindle even more, hampering recovery efforts for the endangered Resident Orcas as well. Low flows are also impacting water quality in many of our rivers and streams, and causing rafting and kayaking business to cancel summer trips. In many areas of the state water users have already been told to cut back their water use until stream flows improve. As bad as this all is it’s likely to get much worse, Climate Change and our states population growth continue to strain Washington’s already over-allocated water resources.  

Even in light of all this, there is still immense pressure to give away our water, like a proposed Crystal Geyser water bottling plant in Randle, Washington that is planning to take 325,000 gallons a day out of the Cowlitz river watershed if its permit is approved by Ecology. That’s where CELP comes in. As Washington’s only water defender, CELP has worked passionately since 1993 to protect and restore clean, flowing waters in Washington, and we are now working around the state to stop this wholesale giveaway of our water resources, and restore flows in the many rivers and streams across the state. But we can’t do it alone.  Your support now means more than ever. Please consider making a donation today.  You can donate online at our secure website, or send us a check in the mail. CELP’s work to protect Washington’s water resources depends on it.    

Take a look at current streamflow conditions here: https://www.usgs.gov/centers/water-dashboard/surface?state=wa


Celebrate Water 2019!

First and foremost, all of us at CELP would like to thank those who participated in this year’s GiveBIG. We raised over $3,300 for Washinton’s waters and we couldn’t have done it without you. With that being said, it’s time to switch gears! Celebrate Water is just around the corner and we have a big evening in store.

Please join us for our annual fundraising event, Celebrate Water, on Thursday, June 20th from 5:30pm-7:30pm! Help us commemorate another successful year of CELP’s work advocating for Washington’s rivers and streams. This year, we will be presenting Larry Wasserman with the Ralph W. Johnson Water Hero Award for his activism which ultimately secured improved protections and management of our state’s water resources.

Before the reception, CELP will be hosting a pre-reception CLE from 4:00-5:00pm, featuring guest speaker Amanda Cronin of AMP Insights. The topic of the talk will be: “Incentives for voluntary groundwater mitigation in Arizona – What’s in it for water users?”

We will also be hosting a silent auction featuring great items and gift certificates from Patagonia, Fishpond, Seattle Mariners, & more!

 

To get your tickets, visit: https://celebratewater2019.bpt.me

 

 


Remembering Jess Roskelley

 

Our deepest condolences go out to board member John Roskelley and his family after the tragic passing of their son Jess at just 36 years old. With his unexpected passing, Jess leaves behind a wonderful wife Alli, two loving parents -John and Joyce, a sister Jordan, and 2 dogs. They are all incredible individuals who deserve the very best care, love, and support in order to get through this devastating time.

To anyone who knew him, Jess was an incredible husband, son, and alpinist.  For more information on the Roskelley family and Jess’ legacy, click here: https://bit.ly/2XIG9rA

 


CELP Summer Internship

We are now accepting applications for a Summer 2019 Legal Intern at our Seattle office.

We seek a legal intern with demonstrated interest in environmental issues to work on projects aimed at establishing protected instream flows.  Qualified candidates will have completed their 2L year and taken an environmental law course.  Coursework or clinical experience in administrative law is preferred. Exact internship dates are flexible, but will run from June – August 2019. Please email a CV, a writing sample, and references to Dan Von Seggern, Staff Attorney  at dvonseggern@celp.org 

.

Deadline for applications is March 1st.

 


In Memory of Nancy Shuttleworth Rust: Former CELP Board President & Ralph W. Johnson Water Hero Awardee

Nancy was born in Iowa City, Iowa on September 15, 1928, the second of the three daughters of Beatrice Gates Shuttleworth and Frank Kayley Shuttleworth. She married the love of her life, Dr. Richard Eno Rust, on June 11, 1949. She received a Master’s degree in Mathematics from the University of Iowa in 1952.

Nancy served as a member of Washington State’s House of Representatives from 1981-1996, having begun a life of political activism by joining the League of Women Voters in the mid-1950s. As a member of the League, Nancy worked on voter registration campaigns, numerous ballot initiatives, tax reform, and the Equal Rights Amendment. From her sixty-some years of involvement in politics and community service, she will be most remembered for her work on environmental issues. She chaired the House Environmental Affairs Committee from 1983-1994. As Chair, Nancy oversaw passage of (or protected from modification) legislation regarding hazardous waste management, workers’ right to know, shorelines management, growth management, and legislation to prevent oil spills on Puget Sound.

Nancy was named the Audubon Legislator of the Year for the legislative sessions of 1983-84 and 1986-87, and she was named the Legislator of the Year by the Washington Recyclers in 1982. After leaving the legislature she continued to work for the environment in many ways, including serving as board president for the Center for Environmental Law and Policy (CELP). In 2006, she was the recipient of CELP’s Ralph Johnson award, which is given in honor of “exemplary service on behalf of Washington’s waters and people.”

Along with her involvement in public affairs, Nancy led a vibrant and varied personal life. The mother of six children, she was active in the PTA and was on the board of Greater Seattle Girl Scouts. she was active in the PTA, served on the board of Greater Seattle Girl Scouts, led Girl Scout troops, and went on countless Girl Scout outings. Having grown up on the East Coast, she fell in love with the Pacific Northwest on her first visit to the area in 1951. She enjoyed getting out into nature in all kinds of ways, whether by day-hiking, back-packing, skiing, biking or as a member of the Washington Native Plant Society.

Nancy and her husband Dick were active in the Bicycle Adventure Club–participating in 40-some multi-day rides–and led a popular 14-day ride that began in Seattle and wound its way through the San Juan Islands to Victoria BC. She and Dick were also avid international travelers. Many of their trips to Europe were on bicycle, but they also enjoyed numerous trips in Europe and beyond as participants in Elder Hostel and Roads Scholars programs.

Back home in Seattle, Nancy loved the symphony, opera, fine arts, and theatre. In synchrony with any other activity, Nancy enjoyed knitting. After knitting multiple sweaters for members of the family, she knit clothing items for a nonprofit humanitarian aid organization, afghans for Afghans.

Memories of Nancy will be cherished by her beloved husband; her two sisters, Margaret Vernallis and Carol Hake and brother-in-law Dexter; her six children, Martha (and spouse Leslie Myrick), David (Janice Reebs), Steven (Cate Brigden), Michael (Julia Sabo), Amy, and Elizabeth; three grandchildren, Arcadia Smails and grandson-in-law Rodney Minott, Alexa Rust, and Benjamin Rust; and one great grandson, Joseph Minott.

A celebration of Nancy’s life will be held on August 12 from 3:00-5:00 PM at Horizon House  at 900 University St. in Seattle (off-street parking available at the corner of University St. and 9th Avenue).


Remembering Vanport Flood’s double tragedy

News Release: May 23, 2018

4:05 p.m. Memorial Day: A moment of silence to remember the double tragedy of the Vanport Flood

Canadians, impacted by resulting Treaty, ask Americans to rethink flood risk management in the lower Columbia River Basin

Canadian-United States Treaty Negotiations to start May 29 – the day following Vanport Flood memorial

Reporter Contacts:

Without warning, on Memorial Day 1948, a combination of heavy winter snowfall, warm temperatures, and spring rainfall sent torrents down the Columbia River, breaking through a railroad embankment serving as a levee, and destroying Oregon’s second largest city, Vanport, near Portland. Built in the floodplain of the Columbia River close to the confluence with the Willamette River, Vanport provided housing for thousands of low-income people. The floodwaters killed at least fifteen people, left 18,000 others homeless, and washed away the community.

The governments of the United States and Canada seized on the Vanport flood to promote a treaty that would authorize dams upstream in British Columbia and Montana, eventually forcing thousands of residents from their homes, and permanently flooding vast river valleys of the Upper Columbia River Basin. Particularly devastating for indigenous people who had lived in the Columbia River Valley for thousands of years was loss of burial grounds and cultural sites, compounding the loss of massive salmon runs caused by Grand Coulee dam. And now, on the 70th anniversary of the Vanport Flood, the United States and Canada are entering into negotiations to modernize that agreement known as the Columbia River Treaty.

“Recognizing the double tragedy impacting thousands of people in Vanport and subsequently in our Canadian and First Nations communities in the Upper Columbia River, we ask for a moment of silence on Memorial Day,” said Mindy Smith, a physician living near Trail, British Columbia. “We also ask that each Memorial Day going forward, we pause to remember and reflect on this double disaster and how people of the Basin are bound together by more than a treaty, but by our need and responsibility to seek equity of benefits and costs in river management.”

The Vanport Flood and its devastating consequences for the upper Columbia River Basin was the focus of a 2016 conference, One River – Ethics Matter, hosted by the University of Portland. This was part of the conference series of Columbia River reconciliation based on the 2001 Columbia River Pastoral Letter by the Roman Catholic Bishops of the international watershed. Highlights of the Portland conference focusing on the Vanport Flood can be viewed on a short film: Portland: One River – Ethics Matter.

“As negotiators for the United States and Canada prepare to sit down to discuss the future of the River, the double tragedy of the Vanport Flood needs to be remembered,” said Martin Carver of Nelson B.C. and coordinator of the Upper Columbia Basin Environmental Collaborative. “With continued floodplain development in the Portland area and elsewhere, and with escalating risks from climate change, the scope of the floodplain problem going forward will only increase.   Americans should not continue to rely on the devastation of upstream ecosystems and communities to allow for downstream floodplain development in Portland. That is fundamentally unjust and cannot be sustained.”

“The Columbia River is one river and ethics matter,” said John Osborn, physician and coordinator of the Columbia River Roundtable. “Past decisions have located people and structures in harm’s way by building in downriver floodplains while permanently flooding upriver valleys with dams and reservoirs – once biologically and culturally rich river valleys now wastelands. The Treaty dams are not going away. But we need to rethink dam management to improve river health and restore salmon runs while protecting communities. That is a compelling legacy of the Vanport Flood double tragedy.”

The moment of silence is scheduled for 4:05p.m. PDT on Memorial Day (U.S.)   The next day, May 29, in Washington D.C., the United States and Canada will begin formal negotiations to modernize the Columbia River Treaty. (link)

Links:

 

Vanport, Oregon – photo from BlackPast.org